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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
and bus ride. and started selling tickets before election day >> there's nothing like being here. i mean i could watch it on television or i could sit in one of the buildings around here and probably look out at it. it's nothing like being in there. kind of like swimming. you can think about the swimming but if you're not in the pool you really can't feel it. >> suarez: for many we spoke to, it wasn't just history but this president that brought them to washington >> we don't think we've had a president like him before or will have one in my lifetime. so it's worth it to be here to pay homage to him and to his beautiful family and to the country that elected him and to the people who elected him. we're just delighted to be a part of this. >> this is history in the making. first of all from an historical perspective who wouldn't want to be here? but more importantly for me, the whole of the obama administration is everything that i hold dear >> suarez: margaret came up with her family from north carolina. for her a second inauguration for the first black president was no less exciting, no l
of the strength of how his legacy will continue it will actually be the 2016 election that will tell us. if you look at history only if a person of the same party is elected after that to turn president that the policies of that present a continue to get in grain and truly part of the cultural fabric. the republican is elected in 2016 you will see some dismantling of certain things. the saw with george bush after ronald reagan. it does not happen very often in history. there's not much of a crowd left at all. matter where you figure in politically you cannot argue that president obama is an incredible writer an incredible speaker. very much appreciated around these parts. folks now moving on to the next stage of this. it is along pennsylvania avenue. the parade they're looking forward to. the first family finishes that quick lunch. about 45 minutes. all of that food that is making me so hungry earlier in our coverage. they arrived very early this morning. kind of like we did here at the national mall for our coverage. they brought along with them some young people from around chicago. that is
are not about him. >> what we're celebrating is not the election or swearing in of a president. we're doing celebrate aring each other. >> reporter: and he talked about the most significant of the weekend, he talks about his wife's haircut. >> i love her bangs. she looks good. she always looks good. >> reporter: and it won't end until late monday night when they attend three different ball. and more than a couple hours away before the ceremonies begin. president obama is only the 17 17th president to have a second inaugural. alternate the u.s. capitol, susan mcginnis, back to you. >> thank you so much. and of course cbs news will provide live coverage of today's inauguration festivities, it begins on cbs 5 and will run until 1 in the afternoon and no noon newscast today. cbs 5 will have reports from christin ayers in washington in the next half hour and during our 5 and 6:00 newscasts this evening. >>> it's 42 lovely degrees in washington right now. >> it's so cold there. >> chilly out there. chilly around the bay area. we have numbers around the 20s
, and they're not totally in love with his first term. he just beat his rival in the election. >> people have lower expectations, so i think we're going to -- he may try and raise that a little bit. this will be a lot of poetry, and the state of the union address is going to be the prose where he really lays out the agenda. >> let's bring in the auth aror the book "barack obama the story" and margaret hoover, republican consultant and cnn contributor. david, what are you expecting to hear? >> i think there's a paradox here, which is that four years ago there were huge crowds and so much ebullience of the moment. he gave such a wintry speech. today there's smaller crowds, i think he's giving a more optimistic speech. i think he feels he's in a much better place today than he was four years ago? >> cornell? >> i think we'll hear some of the things picked up from the campaign. he's got to talk about the economy, talk about the number one issue to americans, and that's jobs and expanding and growing the middle class. we're looking at a middle class that continues to shrink, and it's something tha
to protect six democrats who are up for election in two years from now. six seats where the president had fewer than 42% of the votes and i don't think so that they're going to expose the democrats to having to choose between their constituents who know the value and importance of the second amendment and the president's policies. >> steve: what do you think of what mitch mcconnell said in the robo call that went out to several thousand kentuckiens, to make sure he'll do everything in his power to defeat it. >> we know what that means, it has to do with individual's rights to own and bear arms, you know, which is one of the reasons that i've had disagreements with the attorney general, who thinks it has to do only with the well-regulated militia, but i'm a doctor. i know there's much more to this than just what's happening in gun shows or gun shelves. so if the president wants to push a political agenda, if he actually wants to solve a problem of violence in america, there are things that we can do as a doctor, i will tell you this, with regard to mental health, with regard to a culture o
was elected president and called and said congratulations for your pulitzer in history. i would love to talk to you about how to preserve historical materials and what you've noticed from the presidential libraries you for tin. and on that basis we have talked a good bit while he's been president to renew our acquaintance ship after a 20 year hiatus. c-span: have you had any discussions with him about his whole race initiative? >> guest: absolutely. yes, i have. c-span: what do you recommend to him? >> guest: i think this is a great thing. i personally think from the work that i've done that our racial dialogue in america, our discourse is far behind hour objective reality and where we are; that if you study this period and you see how parochial, how limited, how much violence, how on a custom a lot of white people were even meeting simply from a different denomination or a different section of the country, there's -- ads in the newspaper were divided not only by race, but by sex; "help wanted, female," and jobs were -- you know, for women, were secretaries and teachers. we left it up a whol
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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